Music Arts blog

Alan Robinson Guitar Award

28 Feb 2017
David-Stupples-Guitar-Award-2016.JPG

The annual Alan Robinson Memorial Award for most promising first-year guitarist was jointly awarded to David Stupples and Justis Atkins-Te Kowhai, who both achieved a very similar grade at the end of their first year of study at Ara Music Arts (2016). Alan Robinson was a promising guitar student who passed away during his studies at Ara Music Arts (formerly CPIT Jazz School). This guitar award is given in his memory.

This is the seventeenth year the award has been presented, and has the names of many great guitar graduates on it, including David Haslett (currently touring NZ), Andrew Knopp (recently returned from Canada with his wife/band mate), Sam Blakelock (based in New York) and Richard Ashby (based in Sydney).

Programme Leader Gwyn Reynolds of the recipients;

“It’s great to see the award going to two students who are both into different genres of music [Jazz for David and Contemporary for Justis] but who are both expressing their passion for music through the same medium, the electric guitar. Both these guys are already great players and I can’t wait to hear them in a few years’ time.”

 

Photo – (from Left) Des Robinson, David Stupples, Gwyn Reynolds (Programme Leader – Ara Music Arts), Richard Marrett (Manager, Performing Arts)

M.A.K.E. - Isaac Paneha

21 Feb 2017

M.A.K.E. - Isaac Paneha

My project for the end of year performance was the toy train drum machine. The idea came about after I watched an episode from a talkshow called AKBingo where they used a pair of rubber mallets attached to a train and ran that train through a series of glass bottles to recreate Rossini’s William Tell Overture. Dave combined the idea of the toy train with a previous project from a previous year of using slot cars equipped with a sensor. When the slot car would pass an object it would trigger a sound. We figured that using a toy train on a track would be better than slot cars because the speed of a toy train would be more consistent than slot cars and thus would keep tempo better.

Firstly we had to buy a motorised toy train. In the end we chose Tom and Jerry train set that was made in China and it was not a very good toy. Regardless of how terrible the toy was it was sufficient for the project. Dave Cooper and I (mostly Dave Cooper) then put together a sensor and attached it to the train and we hooked it up to a wireless set that would send messages to a computer to create sounds. The sounds were triggered based on how far away the object was from the sensor and we programmed it to play different sounds based on distance (it didn’t work half the time…). We chose drum sounds because it was a good idea to use this project to control a drum sound and it also meant that we didn’t have to program too many sounds.