Music Arts blog

Songwriting Competition

04 May 2017
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The 2017 Ara Music Arts Songwriting Competition is an annual event with this year’s entries closing on 7 May. Sponsored by Ara and Musicworks, the competition is open to all songwriters in Canterbury year 11, 12 & 13 Secondary school students and Ara Music Arts students. It is free to enter and there are cash prizes and Musicworks vouchers to be won.

The competition culminates with an awards concert at 2pm 21 May in the Music Arts DCCR Auditorium

Historically, Christchurch has produced an amazing past line of songwriting talent, with artists like Bic Runga, Anika Moa and Julia Deans all hailing from here. Ara is proud to announce that this year's judges will be Lauren Mitchell and Matt Barus. Together they form the Christchurch experimental indie folk duo Terrible Sons and independently have had successful artist careers. Lauren aka LA Mitchell, is a successful pop recording artist, singer songwriter and ex member of Dave Dobbyn's band. Matt was the lead singer and songwriter of successful pop band The Dukes. Matt recently had one of his songs recorded by international artist Blondie. Both Lauren and Matt live in Christchurch.

The competition encourages young people to write songs and demonstrates that it’s possible to focus a musical career around song writing. Last year’s event attracted a good mix of styles and sounds, with 11 finalists performing solo and in bands at the prize giving show.

Alan Robinson Guitar Award

28 Feb 2017
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The annual Alan Robinson Memorial Award for most promising first-year guitarist was jointly awarded to David Stupples and Justis Atkins-Te Kowhai, who both achieved a very similar grade at the end of their first year of study at Ara Music Arts (2016). Alan Robinson was a promising guitar student who passed away during his studies at Ara Music Arts (formerly CPIT Jazz School). This guitar award is given in his memory.

This is the seventeenth year the award has been presented, and has the names of many great guitar graduates on it, including David Haslett (currently touring NZ), Andrew Knopp (recently returned from Canada with his wife/band mate), Sam Blakelock (based in New York) and Richard Ashby (based in Sydney).

Programme Leader Gwyn Reynolds of the recipients;

“It’s great to see the award going to two students who are both into different genres of music [Jazz for David and Contemporary for Justis] but who are both expressing their passion for music through the same medium, the electric guitar. Both these guys are already great players and I can’t wait to hear them in a few years’ time.”

 

Photo – (from Left) Des Robinson, David Stupples, Gwyn Reynolds (Programme Leader – Ara Music Arts), Richard Marrett (Manager, Performing Arts)

M.A.K.E. - Isaac Paneha

21 Feb 2017

M.A.K.E. - Isaac Paneha

My project for the end of year performance was the toy train drum machine. The idea came about after I watched an episode from a talkshow called AKBingo where they used a pair of rubber mallets attached to a train and ran that train through a series of glass bottles to recreate Rossini’s William Tell Overture. Dave combined the idea of the toy train with a previous project from a previous year of using slot cars equipped with a sensor. When the slot car would pass an object it would trigger a sound. We figured that using a toy train on a track would be better than slot cars because the speed of a toy train would be more consistent than slot cars and thus would keep tempo better.

Firstly we had to buy a motorised toy train. In the end we chose Tom and Jerry train set that was made in China and it was not a very good toy. Regardless of how terrible the toy was it was sufficient for the project. Dave Cooper and I (mostly Dave Cooper) then put together a sensor and attached it to the train and we hooked it up to a wireless set that would send messages to a computer to create sounds. The sounds were triggered based on how far away the object was from the sensor and we programmed it to play different sounds based on distance (it didn’t work half the time…). We chose drum sounds because it was a good idea to use this project to control a drum sound and it also meant that we didn’t have to program too many sounds. 

M.A.K.E. - Ruth Carruthers

22 Dec 2016

M.A.K.E. - Musical Audio Kinetic Electronics. Students from Ara Music Arts create their own instruments combining the physical with the electronic.

Sound project: Ruth Carruthers

The initial concept I started with was using the pressure inside balloons to control pitch and volume of a synth but the idea evolved in to using a Space Hopper to allow for more movement in the performance.

The volume of the notes would be controlled by sensing the pressure of the air inside the space hopper which would change with weight of the person on it. We first had to test a number of sensor options to fins one which was sensitive enough to detect the small change in pressure inside the hopper. The sensor was then placed in a small 3d printed chamber with a plug that allowed the air from inside the hopper to pressurise the chamber. The pressure information from the sensor travelled via means of an XBee wireless link (a sort of wireless USB cable) to an Arduino board.

The pitch of the notes were controlled via a Pixy camera that allows the tracking of coloured objects. Moving the space hopper left and right increased and decreased the pitch of the note produced. The solid bright colour of the space hopper made it easy for the camera to track. The notes were to sustain so chords could be made and moving the hopper a long way to the right was supposed to reset it but this proved slightly unreliable in practice.

 Using the volume and pitch information the Arduino sent notes to a keyboard connected via midi.

M.A.K.E. - Caleb Waiari

09 Dec 2016

M.A.K.E. - Musical Audio Kinetic Electronics. Students from Ara Music Arts create their own instruments combining the physical with the electronic.

Sound 3 Instrument build – Caleb Waiari

Video-Hero

Initially the plan was to control something using a guitar hero controller, but I didn't know what or how it would work. With the help of Dave (Cooper), we developed a way to control video through a program using the guitar hero controller to change different settings within the program. 

How it works

What we did was we bought a wireless receiver so that we can receive the signal from the guitar-hero controller. This wireless receiver was plugged into a device called an Arduino and the Arduino device was plugged into my laptop. When I played a note or pressed a button on the guitar-hero controller, the wireless receiver sent all the information through the Arduino and the Arduino sent the information into my laptop. We sent all the information into a program called VPT7, which allowed us to control different things about video depending on our setting. 

VPT7 is a free software where you can upload little video clips and manipulate them by messing with various setting such as mixing two clips together, warping the clips, fading in fading out, cycling between different clips, and even changing between the webcam. Because we could send all the Guitar-hero controller information to the laptop, we were able to manipulate the videos using the guitar-hero controller. This required a little bit of programming to make sure that pressing button 1 on the controller would do something different than pressing button 2 etc. 

We ended up using the whammy bar on the controller to control the fade in of the video, so pressing the whammy all the way down will fade the video all the way in. You could also control the blend of 2 clips by holding down the green button and fading the two clips together using the whammy bar. We also made it so that holding down the blue button and using the whammy cycles through the clips, so we could change what the audience was seeing on screen. 

I was able to upload my own clips of my choice so I had about 5 different clips of cool nature shots that I really enjoyed, along with the 5 default clips that come with VPT7. However, I found that I could only cycle through the first 5 clips that showed up within the program (I found this out too late), so while doing the performance I couldn't show all the nature clips I had gathered. 

Overall the instrument build worked pretty well. There was a bit of a problem with my clips and not being able to cycle through them all but apart from that it worked pretty smoothly thanks to the help of Dave. 

M.A.K.E. - David Cloughley

02 Dec 2016

M.A.K.E. - Musical Audio Kinetic Electronics. Students from Ara Music Arts create their own instruments combining the physical with the electronic.

The idea for the assignment came when Dave handed me a Bluetooth motion sensor and said “Think of something funny to hold”. I then spent some time thinking and offering up suggestions to Dave. After finding one that we agreed with I went ahead with the idea of holding a boxing glove.

We spent some time programing the sensor, calibrating the acceleration and sensitivity. We set the sensor so that fast acceleration (a punching motion) would trigger a note. To give more sonic possibilities we set more controls to manipulate the sounds that the sensor could make. This included roll, horizontal movement and vertical movement. After the computer programing I then strapped the sensor into the boxing glove with some black tape. I used black tape because it disguised the sensor really well and helped it to blend into the colour of the glove. I also used this tape because it was convenient and the only tape available.

On performance day Hamish helped me make some sounds for the motion sensor to control. We connected the motion sensor to an iMac via Bluetooth and ran all the sounds through Main Stage 3, which is a program that produces digital sound for live performance. After each new sound was made I would test it with the glove and practice the different movements that manipulated which sound would be produced. We made a list of three different sounds that we shifted through throughout the performance. The first sound was a guitar. The roll triggered a wah pedal and moving up and down manipulated the pitch. The second sound was a synthesizer which had a filter sweep as the roll and pitch as the horizontal movement. The final sound Hamish and I decided to make was a drum trigger. When I punched straight with my fist facing up a snare sound would trigger and when I punched with my fist facing down and kick sample was triggered. The performance was really funny with random noises everywhere and a total ciaos of sounds. Most things seemed to surprisingly work really well. All in all, it was a fun project and I’m very happy with how my instrument turned out. 

Hannah Snelling - Visualising sound with water

29 Nov 2016

M.A.K.E. - Musical Audio Kinetic Electronics. Students from Ara Music Arts create their own instruments combining the physical with the electronic.

Sound 3 at Ara Music Arts this year has been full of interesting things to learn. Using Arduino, sound design and art, recording and exploring technology. It’s been fun. The best bit though was seeing my idea for visualizing sound with water take shape. Although I didn’t have the know how to build this project, the tutor, Dave Cooper, is very knowledgeable and showed me how to put it together.

So what did my project look like and how did it perform? What I made, with Dave’s help, was a series of 12 LED lit humidifiers which responded to the volume level of sound in the room. As the volume increased, new humidifiers started up to match it, in turn. The LED lights accompanying each one were green, amber or red. This was in order to imitate a mixing desk level: as the volume goes from a comfortable level to the high extreme, lights change from green to amber and then red. To clarify, if the volume level was at (1) only the first vaporizer (on the right of the row) would start, along with a green light. If the volume reached (10) all the green and amber lights would be lit (accompanying their humidifiers) but not the last two red LED’s. As the volume decreased, each vaporizer and light on the high end would turn off consecutively, as they had turned on.

All of that was made possible by wiring both the humidifiers and the LED’s through an arduino board so that they could be synchronized to turn on at the same time. The wiring process required some soldering to connect the LED’s and humidifiers to the arduino boards, which allowed the computer code to control them. A microphone and volume sensor was connected to control which ones should be on or off at the point in time. In order to make my contraption interactive with those of my classmates, the microphone was set up in front of the speaker through which the sounds coming from other “instruments” were heard. The code is a fairly simple, if ___, then___. For example, if the volume is greater than (1), then turn on (2). Or, if volume is less than (3), then turn off (3), and so on.

The most difficult part I think was getting the humidifiers to turn on by computer command instead of from their own individual switch. It was interesting seeing how the arduino board had to be wired so that the computer could “talk” to everything. So many little wires and connectors had to be plugged into the board in such a way that it would all work and not interfere with each other. I wouldn’t have known quite where to begin if trying to do this myself. My tutor did most of the difficult work for me, I just had the initial idea and helped with the wiring and testing. It was a lot of fun to build something so out of the ordinary.

All Ears at Ara Music Arts

16 Nov 2016
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Ara Music Arts are excited to be partnering with the ‘All Ears’ team to bring this unique week of workshops to New Zealand from January 23-27, 2017.

This week long program is a great opportunity for musicians of any age and ability. It provides participants a format to explore jazz and improvised music in a fun, safe and nurturing environment, while focusing on developing improvisation skills in the time honored tradition of the jazz greats: learning by ear.

"All Ears is a jazz and improvised music program designed by veteran US educators Dr. Arthur Falbush and Keith Pray. With 14 years of collaborating on many educational programs and with over 50 years of combined teaching experience, All by Ear is an evolution of the original method of learning jazz (by ear).

Jazz musicians since the earliest days of the music learned to play by imitating other musicians.

All Ears takes this concept into an educational environment and provides participants the opportunity to learn how to improve their jazz playing while being supervised by experience jazz musicians and veteran teachers."

For more information

You can register here
 

Graduate Profile - L.A. Barus

28 Oct 2016
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Recalling her earliest memories of her mother singing and playing piano while the family sung in harmony alongside, Ara Music Arts graduate Lauren Barus, AKA LA Mitchell was destined for a career in music.

With her mother making piano lessons compulsory from the age of 6, Lauren recalls enjoying formulating chords but despising sight-reading.

“My grandmother had a small portable record player, my aunt had a collection of 45’s of Elvis and David Bowie under her old bed” she tells, “I remember being around 7 and spending hours playing Space Oddity over, and over again. I adored The Doors and spent a lot of my teens transcribing the organ solos”

Feeling that the curriculum was too restrictive, Barus refused to study music in High School in fear of judgment, instead confining herself to music in her spare time.

Picking up the guitar at age 15, Lauren starting writing songs in the vein of Pearl Jam, Beck, Pavement and Sebodoh, artists she was listening to at the time. She also cites Bic Runga’s debut as helping inspire her first forays into song writing.

“I was led to the belief in my teen years that you couldn’t make money out of music, (I was yet to learn that song-writing was a job) so I needed to justify the cost of study and how I was going to use music study to make a living and finance my wonton desires to pontificate my music. I researched all the institutions. I decided that although piano was my first instrument, I didn’t want to be a piano teacher. So I picked voice. I felt The Ara Music Arts course at the time, and still now, has the best Vocal tutors in the country. So I decided to come here for that tutelage.”

“I found my time at Ara to be academically really rewarding, creatively really challenging, personally transformative. I think the most important thing the Music Arts course gave me was time and space. You cannot underestimate the importance of having time to get really deep within your subject. Unrestrained time, in a space that is purpose built and designed to support the intention of becoming a master craftsperson. I took away from it all the tools I have ever needed, and some I didn’t know I needed, to be a successful session musician, writer, and professional performer.”

“My relationship with the tutors was inspiring, sometimes tumultuous, on my part, always tilted towards challenging me to be more than I thought I was capable of being. It inspired great care and respect for my instrument and for the world of professional musicianship.”

After graduating Lauren performed locally playing Jazz, as her profile grew she appeared in numerous Jazz and arts festivals across the country. Continuing to write and record independently, she released 2 album projects and 2 EP’s of original material. She was nominated in the top 20 Apra Silver Scroll award 2 years running for the songs Apple Heart and When It’s All Too Much.

“Since then I’ve worked with Christchurch Band, Dukes, achieving a platinum single with our song Vampires. I worked as a session musician for Dave Dobbyn, Bic Runga, Tim Finn, Anna Codington and Sola Rosa, Touring around NZ Multiple times as well as Australia, the UK, Singapore and Dubai. 

In 2009 she become a regular member of the collaborative touring ensemble ‘ Fly My Pretties, featuring on 3 albums and 4 Nation wide tours and 2 Australian tours. Barus currently splits her time between being a mother, managing a café and working on a variety of musical projects, one with her husband called Terrible Sons.

CYJO - Christchurch Youth Jazz Orchestra

26 Sep 2016
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The 2016 Christchurch Youth Jazz Orchestra, which rehearses every Monday evening at Ara Music Arts, performed it’s first concert of the season. Originally formed by Tom Rainey in 2011, it was restarted in 2015 through a collaboration between the Big Band Festival committee and Ara Music Arts.

This year the best young jazz musicians from around the city, ably led by Ara Music Arts tutor Scott Taitoko, have continued the tradition of big Band music. Of the band Scott says, “It’s been great watching all the different musicians from all the secondary schools come together, making new friendships and creating great big band sounds”.

The Personelle;

Vocals – Ella Dunbar-Wilcox – Burnside High School

Alto Sax 1 – Ryan Hall – ex-Burnside High School

Alto Sax 2 – Stacey Potter – Burnside High School

Tenor Sax 1 – Aiden McCulloch – Cashmere High School

Tenor Sax 2 – Alena LeNgoc ex–Papanui High School

Bari Sax – Mahon Moevao ex-Papanui High School

Trombone 1 – Ben Rainey ex–St Andrews College

Trombone 2 – James MacKay – ex-Nayland College

Trombone 3 – Serge Beaton – St Andrews’ College

Trombone 4 – Rebecca Harris - RangiRuru Girls’ High School

Trumpet 1 – David Petch – Burnside High School

Trumpet 2 – Angus Rainey – St Andrews’ College

Trumpet 3 - Toby Buckner – Riccarton High School

Trumpet 4 – Stephen Mosa’ati – Burnside High School

Piano – Frankie Daly – ex-Marion College

Guitar  - Matt Howes – Burnside High School

Bass – Hamish Smith – Burnside High School

Drums – Kyle Martin – Papanui High School

Drums - Karen Hu – Rangiruru Girls’ High School

The final concert of the season will be opening for the ‘James Morrison with the Symposium Jazz Orchestra’ concert. Scott again, “What an opportunity for these young musicians to play with James Morrison, an absolute jazz icon! The students are over the moon. Such a fantastic occasion to finish up a solid season”

CYJO with James Morrison and the Symposium Jazz Orchestra – 23rd October at the Charles Luney Auditorium at St Margarets’ College.

Graduate Profile - Johnny Lawrence

19 Sep 2016
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Ara Music Arts Graduate Johnny Lawrence’s journey as a musician started with his father, a classical pianist in Christchurch. Originally a guitarist, the bass became Johnny’s primary instrument after joining his father’s band.

“I eventually fell in love with it…at first I just wanted to play guitar, but [it was] the foundational aspect - how you’re the grounding the band. I love that big bass sound sitting at the bottom of a groove.”

Johnny credits another Music Arts graduate and his High School Bass tutor, Brett Hirst, with inspiring him to audition for the program. On reflection Johnny describes the positive environment and expertise of the tutors with making the program such an enjoyable experience.

As with many Music Arts graduates, Johnny spent the next several years aboard the cruise ships, playing first with a big band, before switching to a jazz trio.“I spent way too long on the cruise ships, I think on or off for about 6 or 7 years. The Jazz trio was great though, we really took it to the future by mixing electronic and groove into the mix.”

From there he went on to Asia playing the hotel covers circuit, before moving to Canada where he focused his playing on rock and pop before returning home to NZ in 2014.

“I loved playing with musicians of so many nationalities, especially Americans. I have a big love for American music and they seem to have the spirit of that music in them. Some of them truly are on another level and a bit more aggressive about making it.”

Since returning to New Zealand Johnny has found success with R&B/Soul/Electronica heroes Electric Wire Hustle. Having recently recorded and toured with them after relocating to Wellington.

“Work hard and play as much as you can with many different people is my advice. Stay hungry and committed to the music. If you have a passion for it you have to go for it. Keep your head down and dig deep and enjoy it!”

Sax Quartets - Gwyn Reynolds & Ted Meager

26 Aug 2016
Gwyn Reynolds

Sax Quartet - Gwyn Reynolds - Q & A

Tell us about your latest project.

Christchurch jazz drummer Ted Meager has composed and arranged a handful of amazing sax quartets. I’m slowly playing through them, recording all the parts and putting them on YouTube.

Why?

They’re that good, I reckon people need to listen to them. Hopefully some sax teachers might purchase them off Ted and get their students to have a go at them. The versions on YouTube will also help the students hear how they go. There written at a great level for advanced students. And, it’s been really fun to try and get them sounding as good as I can. Learning all the studio techniques is a continual process of discovery, and there’s always a curly line or two in each arrangement, so it’s always a blast trying to find the best take(s) on each sax to hopefully blend together coherently.

How many have you completed?

Five finished with a few more to go. I really love the craftsmanship of the lines and the beautiful addition of the new material in them. Ted’s love of jazz and the depth of his knowledge of the genre comes to the fore in these, and there’s the unmistakable infectious Ted-isms throughout the pieces that just makes me smile. The whole-tone scales and arpeggios, the clever reharmonisations and ‘singable’ melodies to name just a few of Ted’s signature moves.

Challenges?

The biggest challenge has been jumping between the saxes. I try to do the whole piece in one sitting, starting with the baritone and moving up the horns ending with the soprano, crash mixing as I go to ensure it all syncs up. Placing the baritone notes at the front of the beat has been a real challenge, as I’m used to playing near the back of the beat – too much listening and transcribing of the great Dexter Gordon I suppose. Then the rest of the horns can lay back a bit on the baritone track to hopefully make it sound ok.

How do we listen to them, and is it possible to buy the scores/parts?

You can listen to the five I’ve completed on YouTube. Harlem Nocturne, It’s You Or No-One, Dedicated To You, Young At Heart, Apocalypso. If you want to purchase the scores/parts, contact Ara Music Arts and we’ll hook you up with Ted. I’m not sure of the cost of them. I reckon they’re worth their weight in gold, but Ted’ll probably let you have each one for the price of a couple decent bottles of vino. Hope you get as much enjoyment out of listening to them as I’ve had playing them. 

New Manager of Performing Arts - Richard Marrett

26 Aug 2016
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Ara Music Arts welcomes Richard Marrett as its new Manager of Performing Arts.

Richard is well-known throughout New Zealand as a musical director and is also an accomplished pianist, arranger and composer. He has been on the staff of Ara for nine years, and for most of that time was leading the NASDA programme as a principal lecturer; many years prior, he taught the vocalists at Music Arts. He has a BMus from Victoria University of Wellington, an LRSM diploma and recently completed the MA (Music) qualification through Wintec.

A sought-after teacher and vocal coach, Richard has conducted and arranged for Christchurch Symphony, Wellington Sinfonia, Showbiz Christchurch, The Court Theatre, Wellington Musical Theatre, ARTCO, Dunedin Operatic, Invercargill Musical Theatre, The Orpheus Choir and the Choral Federation. Several of his orchestrations have been recorded with the NZSO and he has worked extensively as producer and arranger on a number of recording projects. His musical direction credits include some 75 different shows and his most recent project was a collaboration with the well-known Broadway singer, Liz Callaway.

Modern Etudes for Solo Trumpet - Cameron Pearce

22 Aug 2016
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Ara Music Arts tutor Cameron Pearce talks to us about his recently completed project ‘Modern Etudes for Solo Trumpet’.

What is an etude?

1. a piece of music for the practice of a point of technique.

2. a composition built on a technical motive but played for its artistic value.

Merriam-Webster

Encyclopedia Britannica

Idea

My aim was to compose a collection of solo etudes carefully crafted for jazz trumpet. These etudes would be published as a brass text. The text would come with recordings of each etude and it was my hope going into this that I could secure some “big names” in the jazz trumpet world  to get involved in this  project and record these etudes for me.

The plan was to compose etudes that were completely practical throughout for the jazz trumpeter. These new compositions would not only be technically demanding but importantly, the etudes were to be based on and inspired from jazz harmony. This was the key point of difference between my project and the many classically influenced etude books currently available and I felt that if everything came together there could be significant interest in the outcome of this project.

Writing stage

I composed the etudes off and on over a period of about six months. I found this to be a really enjoyable process which involved plenty of analysis of existing solo etudes which were predominantly classical but I was also able to look at what was already on offer for jazz musicians under the banner of “jazz etudes”. These nearly always ended up being written out improvised solo lines which could be played along to a backing track. These are a great resource but quite different to the type of pieces that I intended to create and it was encouraging to see that my compositions, once completed would be relatively unique to the jazz trumpet community.

Big names

While I was still in the middle of writing the etudes, I began contacting potential trumpeters to see if they might be interested in recording an etude or two for me. In a couple of cases the musicians were in the  “friend of a friend” category but essentially I was contacting them out of the blue and so I went into this stage with not overly high expecations but at the same time I figured I had nothing to lose.

As it turns out the response was very positive and I soon ended up with a stellar lineup of with internationally renowned, New York based, jazz trumpeters who were keen to be involved including Dave Douglas, Ingrid Jensen, Scott Wendholt, Terell Stafford and Nick Marchione.

The Bunker Studio – NYC

Once the etudes were completed and the performers confirmed, I flew to New York to record performances of the etudes at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn.

This was an amazing studio to record in and is co-owned by New Zealander Aaron Nevezie who I played with in the New Zealand Youth Jazz Orchestra back in 1997 – sometimes it really is a small world.

That recording session was something I’ll never forget. I did my best to “play it cool” as one trumpet hero after another walked in the door to play my original compositions. It was all a bit surreal.

With the recordings all completed I returned to Christchurch where I tidied up the tracks before sending them off for mastering with Dave Cooper.

At this time I also put the finishing touches to the scores for each etude and sent them off to Michael Story who did a fantastic job designing the book.

Sher music 

With the design work complete and the audio tracks edited, mixed and mastered, all that remained was to contact potential publishing companies to see there was any interest in publishing my work.

As with the trumpeters who had come on board, I decided that I had nothing to lose and that I should aim as high as possible in regards to the quality and reputation of the publishers.

The name right at the top of my list was Sher Music Co.

Sher Music are one of the top (if not the top) publishers in the world of jazz and latin publications. Many, many key resources used at Ara Music Arts and in countless music schools worldwide come from Sher Music including the Real Book Series, the bestselling ‘The Jazz Theory Book’ by Mark Levine, ‘The Jazz Piano Book’ by Mark Levine and ‘The Jazz Musician’s Guide to Creative Practicing’ by David Berkman to name just a few.

Within a couple of hours of emailing Sher Music, I received a reply from Chuck Sher expressing interest in my book. He was going to send it around to a few people to get their opinion on it and then he’d get back to me. Chuck emailed a few days later to say that the response had been very positive and that he’d like to publish the book. I was pretty rapt.

The book ‘Modern Etudes for Solo Trumpet’ is due to be released in October, 2016. You can keep an eye you for it at www.shermusic.com

I would like to thank all of those at Ara whose support made this project possible, in particular those at the Ara Research office.