Whakatau

Whakatau - Semester 2

Join us for the Semester 1 2019 official welcome ceremony for all students and staff.

Whakatau dates:

25 Feb 9.30am Close View City Campus Whakatau
When
Start/End 25th Feb 2019 9:30am-10:30am Duration 1 hour  Location City campus
(Whareora/North Green)
Note: dependent on weather
Pricing

Free

Share

Join us for the official 2019 welcome for all Ara students and staff. Whakatau is an opportunity to pause at the beginning of the year, to bring everyone together in a meaningful way to say hello and welcome, and to commit to doing our very best over the course of the year to help each other through successfully and together.

 
For more information

Phone: 0800 24 24 76 

Email: info@ara.ac.nz

See the full event page
27 Feb 9.30am Close View Timaru Campus Whakatau
Whakatau
When
Start/End 27th Feb 2019 9:30am-10:30am Duration 1 hour  Location Timaru campus
Te Whare Poutama/Gym
Pricing

Free

Share

Join us for the official 2019 welcome for all Ara students and staff. Whakatau is an opportunity to pause at the beginning of the year, to bring everyone together in a meaningful way to say hello and welcome, and to commit to doing our very best over the course of the year to help each other through successfully and together.

 
For more information

Phone: 0800 24 24 76 

Email: info@ara.ac.nz

See the full event page

What is a whakatau?

A whakatau is a form of welcome ceremony that can be similar to a pōwhiri (with karanga and haka) but it can also be undertaken with a single speaker and a song. Here in Christchurch, the local hapū (Ngāi Tūāhuriri) has let us know that pōwhiri are only to take place on the marae, and that it will therefore be appropriate for Ara to undertake whakatau only. The ceremony begins in te reo (the Māori language) and concludes in English.

From time to time, our whakatau also include karanga (the female call that begins the ceremony) and haka (chanting) from the ‘home side’. Those being welcomed will have a spokesperson and that there will be a waiata (song) to support them after they have concluded. Following the speeches, those being welcomed (manuhiri) are invited to come forward and hongi (press noses) with the welcoming party, which is the traditional form of greeting each other in Māori society. The final act of the whakatau is to share some kai (food) and thus lift any tapu (sacrosanct) aspects that have been part of the prior formalities.