Photographs to paint a picture of climate change

News News & events

14 Jul 2015

They say a picture paints a thousand words, but for one CPIT student, a thousand photographs could paint a picture of climate change.

CPIT sustainability and outdoor education student Arthur Machado is planning to illustrate climate change through a series of timelapse photo sequences from photographic stands he has set up at the Salt on the Pier Cafe on New Brighton Pier, the i-SITE cabin at Botanic Gardens and a trial location at CPIT's Rakaia Centre.

photo of Arthur Machado 

"Snap Shot Me" is part of his graduate diploma studies where students design a project that shows an environmental issue.

"Scientists can show climate change with numbers and statistics, but we can show it with images," Machado said.Originally from Brazil, the professional film maker and photographer is utilising his strong multi-media background for what will be a long-term project. In the short term, the photographs would provide a valuable online resource to show seasonal change, and as time progressed, yearly variations in climate, such as snowline, flood and drought levels, he said.

Building on the popular use of hashtagging locations and sharing these on social media, the idea is that people can take photos on their mobile phones and send them to Machado, to help him paint a picture of climate change.Each photographic stand has cellphone and internet access with instructions for taking and sending photos, which reach Machado through the designated email address. He will then gather the photos and upload them to the website www.snapshotme.co.nz

A fourth location for the project is under investigation in the Hooker Valley, in Aoraki Mount Cook National Park, with others also being scoped on private properties. He also intends using existing tourist sites.

"It's a collaborative, simple and sustainable way to engage the public in monitoring climate change at various locations in these uniquely New Zealand environments."

At the same time, the project would be providing visual data that could be adapted to any informative or educational purpose in environmental conservation, he said.